McCloskey, economics as conversation, and sprachethik
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McCloskey, economics as conversation, and sprachethik by Man-Seop Park

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Published by University of Leeds in Leeds .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • McCloskey, Donald N. -- 1942-

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Man-Seop Park and Serap Kayatekin.
SeriesLeeds University Business School -- 98/06
ContributionsKayatekin, Serap., Leeds University Business School.
The Physical Object
Pagination27p. ;
Number of Pages27
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17545664M

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In writing about the "rhetoric of economics"--particularly about the standards which prevent situations where "anything goes" in argument--McCloskey takes an eclectic approach to two philosophical positions, based on Rorty and Habermas respectively. But these positions, despite sharing some common aspects, also differentiate themselves from each other sharply in important ways. The Economic Conversation: A First Textbook by Arjo Klamer, Deirdre McCloskey and Stephen Ziliak is forthcoming. The book takes a open-handed approach to teaching economics, and stresses that economics is in fact a conversation in which the students can take part from the beginning. Yet it has all the rigor that a first-year student can absorb. TY - JOUR. T1 - McCloskey, economics as conversation, and Sprachethik. AU - Park, M. S. AU - Kayatekin, S. A. PY - /10/ Y1 - /10/ N2 - In writing about the 'rhetoric of economics'-particularly about the standards which prevent situations where 'anything goes' in argument-McCloskey takes an eclectic approach to two philosophical positions, based on Rorty and Habermas by: 5. The book takes a open-handed approach to teaching economics, and stresses that economics is in fact a conversation, in which the students can take part from the beginning. Yet it has all the rigor that a first-year student can absorb.

{{{Economie: A Literary Economics}}}. A brief book, some pages, about the economy in literature and economics in the discourse of literary leftism. It will introduce literary people to a conversation in scientific economics that they stopped attending to in the middle of the 19th century. The book was McCloskey's opening move in the development of a humanomics and unification of the sciences and the humanities on the field of ordinary business life. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or Cited by: The McCloskey critique refers to a critique of posts "official modernist" methodology in economics, inherited from logical positivism in philosophy. The critique maintains that the methodology neglects how economics can be done, is done, and should be done to advance the subject. Its recommendations include use of good rhetorical devices for "disciplined conversation.".   In the last page of "The Secret Sins of Economics" Deirdre McCloskey compares herself to Cassandra, the prophetess from Troy, whose advice was ignored by the Trojans as they brought the famous horse into their city. Amusing, yet economics is a science, not a grand retelling of an old myth, and McCloskey is not cursed by by:

The Economic Conversation: A First Textbook by Arjo Klamer, Deirdre McCloskey and Stephen Ziliak is forthcomign. The book takes a open-handed approach to teaching economics, and stresses that economics is in fact a conversation in which the students can take part from the beginning. Yet it has all the rigor that a first-year student can absorb. McCloskey's books, The Rhetoric of Economics() and If You're So Smart(), have been widely discussed. In Knowledge and Persuasion in Economics he converses with his critics, suggesting that they too can gain from knowing their rhetoric. The humanistic and mathematical approaches to economics, says McCloskey, fit together in a new Author: Deirdre N. McCloskey. Deirdre Nansen McCloskey (born Septem in Ann Arbor, Michigan) is the Distinguished Professor of Economics, History, English, and Communication at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She is also adjunct professor of Philosophy and Classics there, and for five years was a visiting Professor of philosophy at Erasmus University, mater: Harvard University. McCloskey is one of the most recognizable names in economics, yet this is the first real attempt to analyze her work in book form. She views economics as a language that uses all the rhetorical devices of everyday conversation, and her controversial standpoint on judging economics by aesthetic and literary standards has been hugely influential.